Tuesday, November 24, 2009

DB's one a' my people now

Dickie Brennan to be named a Kentucky colonel

Right on. I used to work for Dickie...he's good people. Nice to see the Kentucky cartel throwing him a shout out.

In case you had any doubt, the finest corn squeezin's in the world are made in Loretto, Ky.

I get a kick out of the T.V. commercial by those Tennessee boys where they're bragging that they are "the oldest registered distillery in the nation." Well good for them...while they were busy trying to be all legallike and get "registered", we were busy making the best whiskey on the planet.

BTW, don't ever make the mistake of calling that Tennessee crap, bourbon. Bourbon only comes from one place....the hills of Kaintuck.

While we're on the subject, did you know one of the greatest Louisiana novels ever written was by a Kentucky native? Can you name the book and author?

UPDATE: Found this most excellent video on Maker's Mark website explaining the distilling process

18 comments:

termite said...

my high school religion teacher,
Sister Helen Prejean.

:)

charlotte said...

"All the King's Men" by Robert Penn Warren

Dambala said...

Bingo, Charlotte.

Helen Prejean was from Kentucky?

termite said...

actually no., Sister Helen was born in Baton Rouge.
Sister Helen aka 'Kentucky' was a joke that i know some of your readers would remember. ;) waaaaay back when.

Frolic said...

Dambala,

Have you seen the list of famous colonels? Betty White is on there as well!

mf said...

Yeah, Maker's Mark is all well and good but have your tried Buffalo Trace?

http://www.buffalotrace.com/

Dambala said...

I've tried it all and i always come back to Makers.

Anonymous said...

Yes, it's made in Kentucky but in the heart of a bunch of dry counties that can't legally even drink it. Kentucky makes Louisiana look progressive...for other reasons besides this, as well. And don't get me started on cornhole.

Dambala said...

- Yes, it's made in Kentucky but in the heart of a bunch of dry counties that can't legally even drink it.

i think you missed the point of the post. we never really cared too much about what was "legal" in Kentucky when it came to whiskey.

Let me put it like this...New Orleans is a city that's saturated with bars and churches.

I wouldn't live anywhere else.

When one side of the scale tips the other it just gets boring.

Leigh C. said...

I take it you've seen page 58 of this, then:

http://www.neimanmarcus.com/store/sitelets/christmasbook/christmasbook.jhtml?xpage=48

Happy turkey to you and yours, man.

Anonymous said...

--i think you missed the point of the post. we never really cared too much about what was "legal" in Kentucky when it came to whiskey.

Having spent time recently in Kentucky, I can't say I am very impressed. Perhaps I did truly miss the point of the post, but if it is Kentucky-Rah-Rah, well, then it was perfectly understood . It's not like the Kaintocks are Cajuns, with quality food, music, and culture to bring to the table. The scale in Kentucky (Louisville or Appalachia or wherever) is nothing like the scale in New Orleans.

Dambala said...

touche' on Louisville. I agree. But when you put New Orleans up against anything it will undoubtedly shadow the other...that's why I live here and not in KY.

As for the Kaintuck culture...it's sparsely populated and very distrustful of strangers, ergo my reference to Jack Daniels trying to get "registered". We are Scot/Irish settlers and we never really had a palette for government.

I'm sure you haven't had a true taste of Kaintuck ambrosia yet, but Zombie can supply.

You're not going to find the heart of the culture in metropolitan areas of the state.

Anonymous said...

My latest ambrosia of discovery is Old New Orleans Rum. Good stuff, at least to a novice (I need to add some Reed's Ginger drink and a little squeezed lime juice) who prefers red wine and good Belgian beer. About culture, I guess I totally missed it in Kentucky, and that was with wanting desperately to find some. Have you read the chapter in Gladwell's "Outliers" about the Scottish background of Kaintocks?

Dambala said...

Haven't read it, but yeah we were mostly Scot and Irish. Think about it..horses, whiskey and then listen to the scales in Bluegrass...it's once removed from Celtic folk music.

Anonymous said...

Again, it's only a chapter but about the sense of honor and how calling someone an "asshole" is still enough to get blood boiling.

Anonymous said...

Again, it's only a chapter but about the sense of honor and how calling someone an "asshole" is still enough to get blood boiling.

Dambala said...

Huh? I called someone an asshole? Or somebody called me an asshole?

Dambala said...

Old New Orleans Rum Rocks. I'm not even a rum drinker but I do dig it.