Wednesday, March 18, 2009

zombies is sooooo sloooowwww

Here i'm getting my balls busted because I'm apparently not doing a good enough job of trying to piece together an incredibly, complicated story of government graft through anonymous comments:

Anonymous has left a new comment on your post "Yeah, I know, I know...":

Its about time you started putting the pieces together. Baton Rouge is going to cause some people some serious heartburn and guess what Jim Letten isn't involved in that because its outside of his jurisdiction. The rats have jumped ship and threatens to take Baton Rouge politicians down now. Keep up the good work federal law enforcement agents.

509 posts later....I finally see the big picture. Not really...but apparently this anon does.

You see I'm not like one of those "28 Days Later" Zombies....I'm more like a "Night of the Living Dead" zombie. I move really slow...so people have a better chance of getting away before I can eat their brains.

UPDATE: Definitely read the comments section. It's complicated...Anon...if you could summarize for us that would be great. But check this out:

Anonymous has left a new comment on your post "zombies is sooooo sloooowwww":

http://www.accela.com/products/includes/assets/wireless.pdf

Who hosted the wireless for Accela? What did Safety & Permits pay? Uh ohhhhh So Accela didn't have a wireless mesh system in place in New Orleans? But but but Netmethods did thanks to Tropos.

Anyone see that RFP or that contract or what Safety & Permits spent and who they sent those checks too?

It sounds like a bait and switch....or rather a shell game. This makes sense of the mesh network vs. relay network issue which Ciber bamboozled. I am assuming LSI and Ciber suddenly decided to upgrade their new Sony camera array (the bait and switch...they actually bid with a cheaper non-Sony array) to require a mesh network even though the existing network didn't support that system. Luckily...Netmethods had that system in place thanks to Tropos....wwhhheeeww....thank goodness.

Summary: They (ciber/Muppet...via A. Jones) changed the camera system network in midstream so we would be forced to utilize Netmethods.

Am I right anon?

9 comments:

GentillyGirl said...

What's wrong with taking the Red Stick's fat-bags down?

I've been dreaming of this for years.

Leigh C. said...

A sloooow zombie? Like the "Shaun of the Dead" ones that don't get a clue when Queen comes on the jukebox?

Anonymous said...

http://www.dailywireless.org/2005/11/28/new-orleans-gets-free-cloud/

WHERE ARE THE TROPOS UNITS TODAY? Hmmmmmmmmm could they be in La Capital?

New Orleans Gets Free Cloud
Mayor C. Ray Nagin announced that The City of New Orleans will extend a wireless network throughout New Orleans. Most of the equipment was donated by three companies: Intel Corp., Tropos Networks and Pronto Networks.

The Boston Globe reports the city will deploy a municipally owned wireless Internet system that will be free for all users, part of an effort to jump-start recovery by making living and doing business in the city as attractive as possible. The system will also will be used by law enforcement and for city government, such as speeding approval of building permits.



While much of the equipment was donated by firms, the Washington Post says New Orleans will own and operate it. The system which uses devices mounted on streetlights, is scheduled to be operational today in the central business district and the French Quarter and to be expanded over time. New Orleans plans to outsource the network eventually, but until then, the city’s plan is to build and run the network.

New Orleans installed a city-wide wireless network earlier using Tropos gear (case study). It supports interactive cameras throughout the city. Verge is also using mesh in the New Orleans Warehouse District network and providing roaming via Boingo.

Chris Drake, operations manager for New Orleans, said while first responders will still communicate over a radio-band network, the WiFi network can relieve pressure on the radio system for background checks and other police functions.


Before the hurricane, the city had deployed a wireless “mesh” network with video cameras for anti-crime surveillance cameras in parts of the city.


The city uses a Tropos Wi-Fi connection that operates at 1.5 Mbps. The outdoor mesh Wi-Fi network provides communications for the cameras, said Drake.

“We use high-bandwidth, point-to-point wireless to feed bandwidth to omni-directional hot zones powered by outdoor Wi-Fi access points,” he continued. “Each point gives about a one-third mile radius. We can put three to four cameras anywhere in that zone and connect wirelessly through the Tropos unit, back through the ‘bandwidth injection’ point-to-point connection.”

The New Orleans Department of Safety and Permits is using Accela’s laptop/tablet software for automating permitting, inspections, workflow, project management, plan review, code enforcement, and other critical functions. The application hosted off-site by Accela.


Meanwhile, Bell South announced in October they will provide a “pre WiMax” service using Navini gear.

Louisiana is one of those states, prohibiting any locality from offering Internet connection speeds of more than 144 kilobits per second. But a lawsuit by BellSouth, Verizon or SBC might backfire. The city is undertaking one of the most massive rebuilding projects in history and the service would be classified under emergency provisions. Baton Rouge may have no such luck.

Nagin, who was Cox Cable’s top executive in New Orleans before his election in 2002, said the city system would be “just one of several options” residents would have to get Internet service.

Related DailyWireless articles include; Katrina Telecom, Clouds for Fat Tuesday, The Battle of Lafayette, Live From New Orleans, Ham Radio, WiMax: Trial By Fire, Intel On Katrina, BellSouth/Navini in NewOrleans, 700 MHz On The Line, More News Maps, New Orleans wireless network, Solar Electric to Go, FCC Talks Katrina, Pronto Managing Katrina Network, Georgia COWs, Mobile COWs & COLTs, Hurricane Frances Lineworkers, Earthquake First Responders, Hurricane Help, Public Service Bands, and Corpus Christi Cloud.


Posted by Sam Churchill on Monday, November 28th, 2005 at 9:13 am.

Anonymous said...

http://www.dailywireless.org/2005/02/08/clouds-for-phat-tuesday/

Clouds for Phat Tuesday

WiFiNetNews talked to Ron Sege, CEO of Tropos about municipal wireless and the stink surrounding the New Millennium Research Council report on municipal wireless (see: High Noon for City Clouds).




Sege cited Chaska, Minnesota, as a city cited in the report that wasn’t contacted and that is a success story. The town has 2,500 users paying $16 per month and expects to have their total investment repaid within 18 months. Sege said, that the city’s position is that “30 percent of our town is voting with their pocketbooks.”
In New Orleans, Sege said the town has seen a 57 percent reduction in murder rates in areas covered by video surveillance transmitted over their wireless mesh network.

More generally, Sege agreed that the report’s fundamental approach of only presenting negative evidence was flawed. “The right way to write the report is here’s a list of cities that we’ve analyzed, and it makes sense in this situation, and it might not make some sense in this situation,” he said. “That’s the kind of analytic rigor we need.”



New Orleans installed a city-wide wireless video surveillance network using Tropos gear. Tropos can use stock WiFi clients.




City officials are using Sony’s SNC-RZ30N cameras as the “eyes” of the system, and backboning them with wireless and fiber. Sony’s IP cameras feature remote-controlled pan/tilt/zoom, a 25X optical zoom lens, day/night and wireless capabilities. They can read a license plate from hundreds of feet. Images captured on the street are digitized and sent via the city’s network to a main server archive for Internet-based monitoring from any location - whether it’s police headquarters or a patrol vehicle.

The Tropos 4210 is a new high performance, mobile Wi-Fi cell, for in-vehicle deployment. Similar to industry-leading Tropos 5110, it incorporates the Tropos patented Predictive Wireless Routing Protocol (PWRP) and transmits at the maximum FCC allowable EIRP of 36 dBm. The Tropos 4210 can also connect to the in-vehicle laptop or data terminal using WiFi or a standard RJ-45 Ethernet port.

Chris Drake, who works for the Mayor’s Office of Technology in New Orleans, tells DailyWireless;


“I built our Surveillance Camera project where we are running dozens of Sony IP cameras on a mostly wireless network all over the city. I now manage our public safety interoperable communications project for a four Parish (county) area. I am pushing hard for a WiMax solution.”


The New Orleans cloud was developed with the help of Active Video Solutions (New Orleans) and Southern Electronics (New Orleans), with Verge Wireless Networks (New Orleans) acting as the integrator and installer. The city has set up a Web site (www.iseecrime.com) which allows citizen groups, neighborhood organizations, businesses, churches and other community organizations to adopt a camera. The program allows organizations to pay for a camera and place that camera in a location of their choice.

Verge is using mesh in its New Orleans Warehouse District network and providing roaming via Boingo. Installation and testing of the first four Wi-Fi Cells was completed a year ago and enables convention goers at the Hilton and Generations Hall limited free and paid access to the Internet. The Warehouse District should have full Wi-Fi access outside and various places inside hotels, restaurants, and coffee shops.




The XS-312PTW Wireless Network Surveillance Camera (above), is the first 802.11g wireless MPEG-4 network camera with the pan/tilt capability. It can be connected to a wired Ethernet or 802.11g wireless connection.

Jeff Jarvis calls the The Times-Picayune Bourbocam his “proudest professional achievement”.

How about a 360 degree VR Tour?



The definitive Mardi Gras QTVRs are produced by Ray Broussard at PhotographicVR.com (full screen).

Tropos Networks also unwired Corpus Christie, Texas, with a wireless LAN mesh network in an 18.5 square mile area. The network is eventually intended to cover 147 square miles and be used by public safety agencies, government workers, and utlities. Tropos installed more than 125 metro-scale Wi-Fi “clouds” last year in such cities as Philadelphia, PA; New Orleans, LA; Los Angeles, CA; Franklin, TN; Chaska, MN; Corpus Christi, TX; Las Vegas, NV; and Oklahoma City, OK, as well as many international installations.



Posted by Sam Churchill on Tuesday, February 8th, 2005 at 3:12 am.

Anonymous said...

Ahhhhhh El Ciudad de Lafayette has a contract with the FOAZ too! FOAZ is short for "Friends of American Zombie."


http://www.dailywireless.org/2005/02/25/the-battle-of-lafayette/

The Battle of Lafayette

Broadband Reports has news on the Muni battle in Lafayette, Louisiana:


The city of Lafayette, Louisiana is trying to get a triple play fiber-optic network off the ground, despite legal opposition from Cox and BellSouth (USAToday has an excellent primer on the fight).
Bellsouth has now informed the city that if they move forward with the plan, they might consider pulling their Cingular Wireless call center out of Lafayette (the center employs 1,300 people). BellSouth, unlike Verizon, has no plan to deploy fiber to the home.


BellSouth Louisiana President William A. Oliver told The Daily Advertiser that he made no threat to move the call center:


“I didn t say it, Oliver said. “I never made a threat that I would pull any center out of Lafayette or Louisiana in retribution to what LUS is doing.


In a hearing connected with a lawsuit filed by BellSouth, District Judge Byron Hebert ruled that LUS and its governing authority must start over as it goes through the process of issuing up to $125 million in bonds to finance the expanded fiber network. Hebert ruled that citizens must be able to petition for a popular vote on the bond issue.

Lafayette has a city-wide wireless cloud, thanks to Syndeo Communications and Tropos. The network covers 13 square miles using Tropos Networks 5110 Wi-fi cells. Syndeo provides 1 Mbps broadband to residents and businesses in Lafayette.




According to Chris Drake, project director of the mayor’s office of technology in New Orleans, which runs a similar Tropos mesh network in New Orleans, the neighborhood’s murder rate was down 57% and auto thefts were down 30%, thanks to the network.

There’s a pro-LUS blog and an anti-LUS blog (with, apparently, links to the Progress and Freedom Foundation). MuniWireless has additional backgrounders. PBS Now reviews the issues of the “Philadelphia Experiment, tonight at 9pm.

Of course, Philadelphia’s $52 million 800 MHz public service radio network is not without glitches.

Related DailyWireless stories include; DailyWireless Testifies for Muni Networks, Broadband: A National Scandal, High Noon for City Clouds, Cities are Getting Virtual and Oregon is Getting Google.



Posted by Sam Churchill on Friday, February 25th, 2005 at 6:26 am.

Anonymous said...

http://www.dailywireless.org/2005/11/28/new-orleans-gets-free-cloud/

New Orleans Gets Free Cloud
Mayor C. Ray Nagin announced that The City of New Orleans will extend a wireless network throughout New Orleans. Most of the equipment was donated by three companies: Intel Corp., Tropos Networks and Pronto Networks.

The Boston Globe reports the city will deploy a municipally owned wireless Internet system that will be free for all users, part of an effort to jump-start recovery by making living and doing business in the city as attractive as possible. The system will also will be used by law enforcement and for city government, such as speeding approval of building permits.



While much of the equipment was donated by firms, the Washington Post says New Orleans will own and operate it. The system which uses devices mounted on streetlights, is scheduled to be operational today in the central business district and the French Quarter and to be expanded over time. New Orleans plans to outsource the network eventually, but until then, the city’s plan is to build and run the network.

New Orleans installed a city-wide wireless network earlier using Tropos gear (case study). It supports interactive cameras throughout the city. Verge is also using mesh in the New Orleans Warehouse District network and providing roaming via Boingo.

Chris Drake, operations manager for New Orleans, said while first responders will still communicate over a radio-band network, the WiFi network can relieve pressure on the radio system for background checks and other police functions.


Before the hurricane, the city had deployed a wireless “mesh” network with video cameras for anti-crime surveillance cameras in parts of the city.


The city uses a Tropos Wi-Fi connection that operates at 1.5 Mbps. The outdoor mesh Wi-Fi network provides communications for the cameras, said Drake.

“We use high-bandwidth, point-to-point wireless to feed bandwidth to omni-directional hot zones powered by outdoor Wi-Fi access points,” he continued. “Each point gives about a one-third mile radius. We can put three to four cameras anywhere in that zone and connect wirelessly through the Tropos unit, back through the ‘bandwidth injection’ point-to-point connection.”

The New Orleans Department of Safety and Permits is using Accela’s laptop/tablet software for automating permitting, inspections, workflow, project management, plan review, code enforcement, and other critical functions. The application hosted off-site by Accela.


Meanwhile, Bell South announced in October they will provide a “pre WiMax” service using Navini gear.

Louisiana is one of those states, prohibiting any locality from offering Internet connection speeds of more than 144 kilobits per second. But a lawsuit by BellSouth, Verizon or SBC might backfire. The city is undertaking one of the most massive rebuilding projects in history and the service would be classified under emergency provisions. Baton Rouge may have no such luck.

Nagin, who was Cox Cable’s top executive in New Orleans before his election in 2002, said the city system would be “just one of several options” residents would have to get Internet service.

Related DailyWireless articles include; Katrina Telecom, Clouds for Fat Tuesday, The Battle of Lafayette, Live From New Orleans, Ham Radio, WiMax: Trial By Fire, Intel On Katrina, BellSouth/Navini in NewOrleans, 700 MHz On The Line, More News Maps, New Orleans wireless network, Solar Electric to Go, FCC Talks Katrina, Pronto Managing Katrina Network, Georgia COWs, Mobile COWs & COLTs, Hurricane Frances Lineworkers, Earthquake First Responders, Hurricane Help, Public Service Bands, and Corpus Christi Cloud.


Posted by Sam Churchill on Monday, November 28th, 2005 at 9:13 am.

Anonymous said...

http://www.accela.com/company/news/newsletter/summer2006/i07.asp

"The Summit will feature speaker presentations, panel discussions, networking opportunities, and much more. City of New Orleans Chief Technology Officer Greg Meffert will deliver the Summit welcome address, and will describe how New Orleans leveraged Web-based and mobile technology to aid in response and recovery after Hurricane Katrina, and how the need to innovate has resulted in new efficiencies with long-term benefits."

http://www.accela.com/company/news/newsletter/fall2006/i01.asp

Who got the Safety & Permits software again? Accela that's who. Mike Centineo--former Director for Dept of Safety & Permits for N.O. was there too. Glad to see Greg was the featured speaker while Centineo was a featured presenter.

Accela's White Page report on New Orleans http://www.accela.com/products/csneworleans.asp

Anonymous said...

http://www.accela.com/products/includes/assets/wireless.pdf

Who hosted the wireless for Accela? What did Safety & Permits pay? Uh ohhhhh So Accela didn't have a wireless mesh system in place in New Orleans? But but but Netmethods did thanks to Tropos.

Anyone see that RFP or that contract or what Safety & Permits spent and who they sent those checks too?

Anonymous said...

The Quote of the Week!

Me and Mr Jones
We got a thing goin'on
We both know that it's wrong
But it's much too strong
To let it go now

We meet every day at the same cafe
Six-thirty and no one knows he'll be there
Holding hands, making all kinds of plans
While the juke box plays our favorite songs

Me and Mr Jones
We got a thing goin'on
We both know that it's wrong
But it's much too strong
To let it go now

We gotta be extra careful
That do we don't build our hopes up too high
Because he's got his own obligations
And so, and so, do I

Me and Mr Jones
We got a thing goin'on
We both know that it's wrong
But it's much too strong
To let it go now

Well, it's time for us to be leaving
It hurts so much, it hurts so much inside
Now he'll go his way snd I'll go mine
Tomorrow we'll meet
The same pklace, the same time

Me and Mr Jones
We got a thing goin'on
We both know that it's wrong
But it's much too strong
To let it go now